Jichun Xie

Positions:

Associate Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Integrative Genomics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2011

University of Pennsylvania

Grants:

Duke CTSA (UL1)

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Biostatistician Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Training Program

Administered By
Basic Science Departments
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

A hands-on, integrative next-generation sequencing course: design, experiment, and analysis

Administered By
Integrative Genomics
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Training Faculty
Start Date
End Date

Race-Related Alternative Splicing: Novel Targets in Prostate Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Biostatistician
Start Date
End Date

Statistical/Computational Methods for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy

Administered By
Integrative Genomics
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Microtransplantation in older patients with AML: A pilot study of safety, efficacy and immunologic effects.

Older AML patients have low remission rates and poor survival outcomes with standard chemotherapy. Microtransplantation (MST) refers to infusion of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells without substantial engraftment. MST has been shown to improve clinical outcomes compared with chemotherapy alone. This is the first trial reporting on broad correlative studies to define immunologic mechanisms of action of MST in older AML patients. Older patients with newly diagnosed AML were eligible for enrollment, receiving induction chemotherapy with cytarabine (100 mg/m2) on days 1-7 and idarubicin (12 mg/m2) on days 1-3 (7 + 3). MST was administered 24 hours later. Patients with complete response (CR) were eligible for consolidation with high dose cytarabine (HiDAC) and a second cycle of MST. Responses were evaluated according to standard criteria per NCCN. Immune correlative studies were performed. Sixteen patients were enrolled and received 7 + 3 and MST (median age 73 years). Nine (56%) had high-risk and seven (44%) had standard-risk cytogenetics. Ten episodes of CRS were observed. No cases of GVHD or treatment-related mortality were reported. Event-free survival (EFS) was 50% at 6 months and 19% at 1 year. Overall survival (OS) was 63% at 6 months and 44% at 1 year. Donor microchimerism was not detected. Longitudinal changes were noted in NGS, TCR sequencing, and cytokine assays. Addition of MST to induction and consolidation chemotherapy was well tolerated in older AML patients. Inferior survival outcomes in our study may be attributed to a higher proportion of very elderly patients with high-risk features. Potential immunologic mechanisms of activity of MST include attenuation of inflammatory cytokines and emergence of tumor-specific T cell clones.
Authors
Sung, AD; Jauhari, S; Siamakpour-Reihani, S; Rao, AV; Staats, J; Chan, C; Meyer, E; Gadi, VK; Nixon, AB; Lyu, J; Xie, J; Bohannon, L; Li, Z; Hourigan, CS; Dillon, LW; Wong, HY; Shelby, R; Diehl, L; de Castro, C; LeBlanc, T; Brander, D; Erba, H; Galal, A; Stefanovic, A; Chao, N; Rizzieri, DA
MLA Citation
Sung, Anthony D., et al. “Microtransplantation in older patients with AML: A pilot study of safety, efficacy and immunologic effects.Am J Hematol, vol. 95, no. 6, June 2020, pp. 662–71. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/ajh.25781.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434771
PMID
32162718
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Hematol
Volume
95
Published Date
Start Page
662
End Page
671
DOI
10.1002/ajh.25781

Phase II Trial of Pasireotide to Prevent GI Toxicity and Acute Gvhd in Allogeneic HSCT

Authors
Ramalingam, S; Siamakpour-Reihani, S; Bohannon, L; Ren, Y; Sibley, A; Nixon, A; Lyu, J; Xie, J; Choi, T; Gasparetto, C; Horwitz, ME; Long, GD; Lopez, R; Rizzieri, DA; Sarantopoulos, S; Chao, NJ; Sung, AD
MLA Citation
Ramalingam, Sendhilnathan, et al. “Phase II Trial of Pasireotide to Prevent GI Toxicity and Acute Gvhd in Allogeneic HSCT.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 26, no. 3, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2020, pp. S48–49.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434724
Source
wos
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
S48
End Page
S49

156 Independent Associations With 30- and 90-Day Unplanned Readmissions After Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery: A National Trend Analysis of 144 123 Patients

Authors
Elsamadicy, AA; Ren, X; Kemeny, H; Charalambous, L; Rahimpour, S; Williamson, T; Goodwin, CR; Abd-El-Barr, MM; Gottfried, ON; Xie, J; Lad, N
MLA Citation
Elsamadicy, Aladine A., et al. “156 Independent Associations With 30- and 90-Day Unplanned Readmissions After Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery: A National Trend Analysis of 144 123 Patients.” Neurosurgery, vol. 65, no. CN_suppl_1, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2018, pp. 100–100. Crossref, doi:10.1093/neuros/nyy303.156.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434383
Source
crossref
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
65
Published Date
Start Page
100
End Page
100
DOI
10.1093/neuros/nyy303.156

Long-term Cost Utility of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

Authors
Farber, SH; Han, JL; Elsamadicy, AA; Hussaini, Q; Yang, S; Pagadala, P; Parente, B; Xie, J; Lad, SP
MLA Citation
Farber, S. Harrison, et al. “Long-term Cost Utility of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.” Pain Physician, vol. 20, no. 6, AM SOC INTERVENTIONAL PAIN PHYSICIANS, Sept. 2017, pp. E796–804.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1293374
Source
wos
Published In
Pain Physician
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
E796
End Page
E804

Understanding the temporal evolution of neuronal connectivity in cultured networks using statistical analysis.

BACKGROUND: Micro-Electrode Array (MEA) technology allows researchers to perform long-term non-invasive neuronal recordings in-vitro while actively interacting with the cultured neurons. Despite numerous studies carried out using MEAs, many functional, chemical and structural mechanisms of how dissociated cortical neurons develop and respond to external stimuli are not yet well understood because of the lack of quantitative studies that assess how their development can be affected by chronic external stimulation. METHODS: To investigate network changes, we analyzed a large MEA data set composed of neuron spikes recorded from cultures of dissociated rat cortical neurons plated on MEA dishes with 59 recording electrodes each. Neural network activity was recorded during the first five weeks of each culture's in-vitro development. Stimulation sessions were delivered to each of the 59 electrodes. The False Discovery Rate technique was used to quantify the temporal evolution of dissociated cortical neurons. Our analysis focused on network responses that occurred within selected time window durations, namely 50 ms, 100 ms and 150 ms after stimulus onset. RESULTS: Our results show an evolution in dissociated cortical neuronal network activity over time, that reflects the network synaptic evolution. Furthermore, we tested the sensitivity of our technique to different observation time windows and found that varying the time windows, allows us to capture different dynamics of the observed responses. In addition, when selecting a 150 ms observation time window, our findings indicate that cultures dissociated from the same brain tissue display trends in their temporal evolution that are more similar than those obtained from different brains. CONCLUSION: Our results emphasize that the FDR technique can be implemented without the need to make any particular assumptions about the data a priori. The proposed technique was able to capture the well-known dissociated cortical neuron networks' temporal evolution, that has been previously observed in in-vivo and in intact brain tissue studies. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the time window that is used to capture the stimulus-evoked network responses is a critical parameter to analyze the electrical behavioral and temporal evolution of dissociated cortical neurons.
Authors
Napoli, A; Xie, J; Obeid, I
MLA Citation
Napoli, Alessandro, et al. “Understanding the temporal evolution of neuronal connectivity in cultured networks using statistical analysis.Bmc Neurosci, vol. 15, Jan. 2014, p. 17. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/1471-2202-15-17.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1099895
PMID
24443925
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Neuroscience
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
17
DOI
10.1186/1471-2202-15-17