Tammara Watts

Positions:

Instructor in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Commu Sciences

Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 1995

University of Virginia

M.D. 2004

University of Maryland - Baltimore

Ph.D. 2005

University of Maryland - Baltimore

Otolaryngology Resident, Otolaryngology

Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine

Facial Plastics & Microvascular Reconstruction Fellow, Otolaryngology

Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine

Publications:

Venous thromboembolism in patients with head and neck cancer after surgery.

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to report the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with head and neck cancer after surgery. METHODS: This was a single-institution, retrospective cohort: 134 patients underwent resection and simultaneous microvascular reconstruction. The primary endpoint was identification of confirmed or suspicious VTE within 30 days of surgery. RESULTS: Two subjects (1.4%) with confirmed VTE (1 pulmonary embolism, 1 deep venous thrombosis) and 6 subjects (4.4%) with suspicious VTE (1 acute respiratory failure, 1 sudden cardiac arrest, and 4 cases of leg edema without imaging) were identified. The strongest predictors of possible VTE were prior VTE (p = .004; odds ratio [OR], 25.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-556.40), red cell transfusion (p = .009; OR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.16-2.80), high body mass index (p = .015, OR, 1.29, 95% CI, 1.05-1.58), and older age (p = .046; OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.19). CONCLUSION: The incidence of VTE in patients with head and neck cancer after resection and microvascular reconstruction ranged from 1.4% to 5.8%.
Authors
Thai, L; McCarn, K; Stott, W; Watts, T; Wax, MK; Andersen, PE; Gross, ND
MLA Citation
Thai, Leo, et al. “Venous thromboembolism in patients with head and neck cancer after surgery..” Head Neck, vol. 35, no. 1, 2013, pp. 4–9. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/hed.22920.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426665
PMID
22302625
Source
pubmed
Published In
Head Neck
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
4
End Page
9
DOI
10.1002/hed.22920

Malignant melanoma induces migration and invasion of adult mesenchymal stem cells.

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine if melanoma cells secrete chemotactic factors that result in the migration of multipotent stem cells. STUDY DESIGN: In vitro cell culture. METHODS: Chemotaxis and invasion of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was determined using the modified Boyden chamber assay. Quantification of growth factors secreted by melanoma cells (A375) was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Conditioned A375 melanoma media caused significant migration and invasion of hMSCs compared to serum-free controls and conditioned media from normal melanocytes (P < .0001). The migratory effect appeared maximal after the A375 media was conditioned for 48 hours. Physiologically relevant concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) (90 pg/mL) secreted by A375 melanoma cells caused significant migration of hMSCs (P < .001) compared to serum-free and normal melanocyte controls. Neutralization of FGF2 inhibited the migration of hMSCs to that of the negative controls (conditioned media from normal melanocytes). CONCLUSIONS: The melanoma tumor microenvironment may be maintained through chemotaxis and invasion of multipotent hMSCs, and this migratory effect appears to be mediated in part through secretion of FGF2 by melanoma cells.
Authors
Watts, TL; Cui, R
MLA Citation
Watts, Tammara L., and Ruwen Cui. “Malignant melanoma induces migration and invasion of adult mesenchymal stem cells..” Laryngoscope, vol. 122, no. 12, Dec. 2012, pp. 2769–72. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/lary.23652.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426661
PMID
23070796
Source
pubmed
Published In
Laryngoscope
Volume
122
Published Date
Start Page
2769
End Page
2772
DOI
10.1002/lary.23652

Median nerve injury associated with radial forearm free flap harvest.

Authors
Brickman, DS; Watts, TL; Mirarchi, AJ; Wax, MK
MLA Citation
Brickman, Daniel S., et al. “Median nerve injury associated with radial forearm free flap harvest..” Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, vol. 145, no. 6, Dec. 2011, pp. 1057–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/0194599811408397.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426669
PMID
21540315
Source
pubmed
Published In
Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Volume
145
Published Date
Start Page
1057
End Page
1059
DOI
10.1177/0194599811408397

Immediate eye rehabilitation at the time of facial nerve sacrifice.

OBJECTIVE: In the setting of known facial nerve sacrifice or injury, patients require precautions to prevent exposure keratitis and the morbidity that follows. One recommended treatment is surgical placement of a gold weight with or without lateral tarsal strip. In patients in whom the facial nerve has been sacrificed, it is unknown whether rehabilitation should be simultaneous or in the perioperative period. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series with chart review of patients who underwent immediate rehabilitation of the eye (gold weight and lateral tarsal strip) following facial nerve resection. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From 1998 to 2009, 52 patients were studied. Postoperative ophthalmologic complications and the need for revision surgeries were measured. RESULTS: A gold weight was placed in all patients, and 48 of 52 (92%) simultaneous lateral tarsal strips were performed. The facial nerve was sacrificed in 51 of 52 (88%) patients, and the remaining patient had a known preoperative facial nerve paralysis. Thirty-six of 52 (69%) required free tissue transfer for reconstruction, underscoring the extensive resections performed. A 1.2-g gold weight was placed in 50 of 52 (96%) patients. Three (6%) patients required gold weight revision with a larger weight and 3 (6%) for extrusion. Eight (16.7%) patients underwent revision of the lateral tarsal strip for ectropion. CONCLUSIONS: No patients developed ophthalmologic complications. Patients undergoing radical surgical resections with known or suspected injury of the facial nerve should be considered for simultaneous rehabilitation of the upper and lower eye.
Authors
MLA Citation
Watts, Tammara L., et al. “Immediate eye rehabilitation at the time of facial nerve sacrifice..” Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, vol. 144, no. 3, Mar. 2011, pp. 353–56. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/0194599810394314.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426667
PMID
21493195
Source
pubmed
Published In
Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Volume
144
Published Date
Start Page
353
End Page
356
DOI
10.1177/0194599810394314

Traumatic hemorrhage and rapid expansion of a cervical lymphatic malformation.

Authors
Bhatt, N; Perakis, H; Watts, TL; Borders, JC
MLA Citation
Bhatt, Nishant, et al. “Traumatic hemorrhage and rapid expansion of a cervical lymphatic malformation..” Ear Nose Throat J, vol. 90, no. 1, Jan. 2011, pp. 20–22. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/014556131109000106.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426676
PMID
21229505
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ear Nose Throat J
Volume
90
Published Date
Start Page
20
End Page
22
DOI
10.1177/014556131109000106