Momen Wahidi

Overview:

Emphysema, Lung Nodules, Lung Cancer, Bronchoscopy, Pleural Diseases

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1992

Damascus University, Faculty of Medicine (Syria)

Preliminary Internship, Medicine

Abington Memorial Hospital Dixon School of Nursing

Medical Resident, Medicine

Indiana University at Indianapolis

Chief Medical Resident, Medicine

Indiana University at Indianapolis

Fellow in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Percepta R-1 Registry

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

All In One: Multicenter prospective trial of Electromagnetic Bronchoscopic and Electromagnetic Transthoracic approaches for the biopsy of peripheral pulmonary nodules

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

CPR-05394 ANET Electrosurgery Applicator Pilot Evaluation Study

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

19-Gauge needle aspiration of thoracic lymph nodes

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

EAST 2: Elaluation of the Archimedes System for Transparenchymal Nodule Access 2

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Collection and Handling of Thoracic Small Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Ancillary Studies: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists in Collaboration With the American College of Chest Physicians, Association for Molecular Pathology, America

CONTEXT.—:The need for appropriate specimen use for ancillary testing has become more commonplace in the practice of pathology. This, coupled with improvements in technology, often provides less invasive methods of testing, but presents new challenges to appropriate specimen collection and handling of these small specimens, including thoracic small biopsy and cytology samples. OBJECTIVE.—:To develop a clinical practice guideline including recommendations on how to obtain, handle, and process thoracic small biopsy and cytology tissue specimens for diagnostic testing and ancillary studies. METHODS.—:The College of American Pathologists convened an expert panel to perform a systematic review of the literature and develop recommendations. Core needle biopsy, touch preparation, fine-needle aspiration, and effusion specimens with thoracic diseases including malignancy, granulomatous process/sarcoidosis, and infection (eg, tuberculosis) were deemed within scope. Ancillary studies included immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, mutational analysis, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and microbiologic studies routinely performed in the clinical pathology laboratory. The use of rapid on-site evaluation was also covered. RESULTS.—:Sixteen guideline statements were developed to assist clinicians and pathologists in collecting and processing thoracic small biopsy and cytology tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS.—:Based on the systematic review and expert panel consensus, thoracic small specimens can be handled and processed to perform downstream testing (eg, molecular markers, immunohistochemical biomarkers), core needle and fine-needle techniques can provide appropriate cytologic and histologic specimens for ancillary studies, and rapid on-site cytologic evaluation remains helpful in appropriate triage, handling, and processing of specimens.
Authors
Roy-Chowdhuri, S; Dacic, S; Ghofrani, M; Illei, PB; Layfield, LJ; Lee, C; Michael, CW; Miller, RA; Mitchell, JW; Nikolic, B; Nowak, JA; Pastis, NJ; Rauch, CA; Sharma, A; Souter, L; Billman, BL; Thomas, NE; VanderLaan, PA; Voss, JS; Wahidi, MM; Yarmus, LB; Gilbert, CR
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441434
PMID
32401054
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Published Date
DOI
10.5858/arpa.2020-0119-cp

Removal of Epithelialized Uncovered Metal Stent. A New Approach to An Old Problem.

Authors
MLA Citation
Cheng, George Z., et al. “Removal of Epithelialized Uncovered Metal Stent. A New Approach to An Old Problem.Annals of the American Thoracic Society, vol. 17, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 638–41. Epmc, doi:10.1513/annalsats.201909-722cc.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439962
PMID
32356691
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
638
End Page
641
DOI
10.1513/annalsats.201909-722cc

The Use of Bronchoscopy During the COVID-19 Pandemic: CHEST/AABIP Guideline and Expert Panel Report.

BACKGROUND:The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has swept the globe and is causing significant morbidity and mortality. Given that the virus is transmitted via droplets, open airway procedures such as bronchoscopy pose a significant risk to health-care workers (HCWs). The goal of this guideline was to examine the current evidence on the role of bronchoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic and the optimal protection of patients and HCWs. RESEARCH QUESTION:▪▪▪ STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A group of approved panelists developed key clinical questions by using the Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format that addressed specific topics on bronchoscopy related to COVID-19 infection and transmission. MEDLINE (via PubMed) was systematically searched for relevant literature and references were screened for inclusion. Validated evaluation tools were used to assess the quality of studies and to grade the level of evidence to support each recommendation. When evidence did not exist, suggestions were developed based on consensus using the modified Delphi process. RESULTS:The systematic review and critical analysis of the literature based on six PICO questions resulted in six statements: one evidence-based graded recommendation and 5 ungraded consensus-based statements. INTERPRETATION:The evidence on the role of bronchoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic is sparse. To maximize protection of patients and HCWs, bronchoscopy should be used sparingly in the evaluation and management of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infections. In an area where community transmission of COVID-19 infection is present, bronchoscopy should be deferred for nonurgent indications, and if necessary to perform, HCWs should wear personal protective equipment while performing the procedure even on asymptomatic patients.
Authors
Wahidi, MM; Shojaee, S; Lamb, CR; Ost, D; Maldonado, F; Eapen, G; Caroff, DA; Stevens, MP; Ouellette, DR; Lilly, C; Gardner, DD; Glisinski, K; Pennington, K; Alalawi, R
MLA Citation
Wahidi, Momen M., et al. “The Use of Bronchoscopy During the COVID-19 Pandemic: CHEST/AABIP Guideline and Expert Panel Report.Chest, May 2020. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.chest.2020.04.036.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1440527
PMID
32361152
Source
epmc
Published In
Chest
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.chest.2020.04.036

Effect of Zephyr Endobronchial Valves on Dyspnea, Activity Levels and Quality of Life at One Year.

RATIONALE:Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction (BLVR) with Zephyr® Valves improves lung function, exercise tolerance and quality of life (QoL) of patients with hyperinflated emphysema and little to no collateral ventilation (CV). OBJECTIVES:Post-hoc analysis of patient reported outcomes (PROs) including multidimensional measures of dyspnea, activity, and QoL in the LIBERATE Study are reported. METHODS:190 patients with severe heterogeneous emphysema and little to no CV in the target lobe were randomized 2:1 to Zephyr Valve or Standard of Care (SoC). Changes in PROs at 12-months in the two groups were compared: Dyspnea: Transitional Dyspnea Index (TDI) focal score, COPD Assessment Test (CAT; breathlessness on hill/stairs), BORG, EXACT-PRO dyspnea domain; activity: TDI magnitude of task/effort/functional impairment, CAT (limited activities), SGRQ-activity domain; and psychosocial status: St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) - impacts domain, CAT (confidence and energy). RESULTS:At 12-months, Zephyr Valve patients achieved statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in SGRQ, CAT, and TDI Focal score compared to SoC. Improvements in SGRQ were driven by the "impacts" and "activity" domains (p<0.05, and p<0.001, respectively). Reduction in CAT was through improvements in breathlessness (p<0.05), energy level (p<0.05), activities (p<0.001) and increased confidence when leaving home (p<0.05). TDI measures of effort, task, and functional impairment were uniformly improved (p<0.001). The EXACT-PRO dyspnea domain was significantly improved in Zephyr group. Improvements correlated with changes in residual volume (RV) and RV/TLC ratio. CONCLUSION:Severe hyperinflated emphysema patients achieving lung volume reductions with Zephyr valves experience improvements in multidimensional scores for breathlessness, activity and psychosocial parameters out to at least 12-months. Clinical trial registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01796392).
Authors
Dransfield, MT; Garner, JL; Bhatt, SP; Slebos, D-J; Klooster, K; Sciurba, FC; Shah, PL; Marchetti, NT; Sue, RD; Wright, S; Rivas-Perez, H; Wiese, TA; Wahidi, MM; de Oliveira, HG; Armstrong, B; Radhakrishnan, S; Shargill, NS; Criner, GJ; LIBERATE Study Group,
MLA Citation
Dransfield, Mark T., et al. “Effect of Zephyr Endobronchial Valves on Dyspnea, Activity Levels and Quality of Life at One Year.Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Mar. 2020. Epmc, doi:10.1513/annalsats.201909-666oc.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436969
PMID
32223724
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Published Date
DOI
10.1513/annalsats.201909-666oc

American Association for Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology (AABIP) Statement on the Use of Bronchoscopy and Respiratory Specimen Collection in Patients with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 Infection.

Authors
Wahidi, MM; Lamb, C; Murgu, S; Musani, A; Shojaee, S; Sachdeva, A; Maldonado, F; Mahmood, K; Kinsey, M; Sethi, S; Mahajan, A; Majid, A; Keyes, C; Alraiyes, AH; Sung, A; Hsia, D; Eapen, G
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1435468
PMID
32195687
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol
Published Date
DOI
10.1097/LBR.0000000000000681