Neal Ready

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1983

University of California at Irvine

M.D. 1986

Vanderbilt University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Brown University

Fellow in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Brown University

Fellow in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Tufts University

Grants:

Evaluation of Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Resected Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Refining and Validating Genomic Signatures in Lung Cancer

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Programs in Clinical Effectiveness of Cancer Pharmacogenomics

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ADRIATIC

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

B9991023

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Long-term outcomes with nivolumab (Nivo) vs docetaxel (Doc) in patients (Pts) with advanced (Adv) NSCLC: CheckMate 017 and CheckMate 057 2-y update

Authors
Barlesi, F; Steins, M; Horn, L; Ready, N; Felip, E; Borghaei, H; Spigel, DR; Arrieta, O; Antonia, SJ; Fayette, J; Rizvi, N; Crinò, L; Reck, M; Eberhardt, WE; Hellmann, M; Geese, WJ; Li, A; Healey, D; Brahmer, JR; Paz-Ares, L
MLA Citation
Barlesi, F., et al. “Long-term outcomes with nivolumab (Nivo) vs docetaxel (Doc) in patients (Pts) with advanced (Adv) NSCLC: CheckMate 017 and CheckMate 057 2-y update.” Annals of Oncology, vol. 27, 2016, p. vi420. Scopus, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdw383.15.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1367922
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
vi420
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdw383.15

The immunotherapeutic landscape in non-small cell lung cancer and its surgical horizons.

Lung cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite tremendous advances in surgical technique, chemotherapy regimens, radiation, and targeted therapies, survival is <50% at 5 years. Immunotherapy, specifically immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), demonstrates promise as a solution to this clinical problem. Several agents have been Food and Drug Administration-approved for locally advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Further studies are now exploring the use of these agents in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. Although ICIs have demonstrated meaningful efficacy in NSCLC and other advanced malignancies, they are not without adverse toxicities. Furthermore, there are minimal data on their use in the perioperative period. Here we discuss the current domain of ICIs and their surgical implications in NSCLC.
Authors
Rhodin, KE; Rucker, AJ; Ready, NE; D'Amico, TA; Antonia, SJ
MLA Citation
Rhodin, Kristen E., et al. “The immunotherapeutic landscape in non-small cell lung cancer and its surgical horizons.J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, vol. 159, no. 4, Apr. 2020, pp. 1616–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.08.138.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423626
PMID
31836182
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
1616
End Page
1623
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.08.138

Definitive Radiotherapy for Inoperable Stage IIB Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: Patterns of Care and Comparative Effectiveness.

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to analyze practice patterns and perform comparative effectiveness of definitive radiotherapy techniques for inoperable stage IIB (American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adults in the National Cancer Database diagnosed with T3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 NCSLC between 2004 and 2015 who received definitive radiotherapy were identified. Cases were divided as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT), or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) and stratified by systemic therapy (ST). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the effect of covariates on overall survival (OS). Subgroup analysis by tumor size, chest wall invasion, multifocality, and ST use was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates of OS. RESULTS: A total of 10,081 subjects met inclusion criteria: 4401 T3N0M0 (66.5% CFRT, 11.0% HFRT, and 22.5% SBRT) and 5680 T1-2N1M0 (92.5% CFRT and 7.5% HFRT). For T3N0M0 NSCLC, SBRT utilization increased from 3.7% in 2006% to 35.4% in 2015. Subjects treated with SBRT were more likely to have smaller tumors, multifocal tumors, or adenocarcinoma histology. SBRT resulted in similar or superior OS compared with CFRT for tumors > 5 cm, tumors invading the chest wall, or multifocal tumors. SBRT was significantly associated with improved OS on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.715; P < .001). For T1-2N1M0 NSCLC, patients treated with HFRT were significantly older and less likely to receive ST; nevertheless, there was no difference in OS between HFRT and CFRT on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: CFRT + ST is utilized most frequently to treat stage IIB NSCLC in the United States when surgery is not performed, though it is decreasing. SBRT utilization for T3N0M0 NSCLC is increasing and was associated with improved OS.
Authors
Jacobs, CD; Gao, J; Wang, X; Clarke, JM; Tong, B; Ready, NE; Suneja, G; Kelsey, CR; Torok, JA
MLA Citation
Jacobs, Corbin D., et al. “Definitive Radiotherapy for Inoperable Stage IIB Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: Patterns of Care and Comparative Effectiveness.Clin Lung Cancer, vol. 21, no. 3, May 2020, pp. 238–46. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cllc.2019.10.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1422411
PMID
31757764
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lung Cancer
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
238
End Page
246
DOI
10.1016/j.cllc.2019.10.005

Nivolumab Monotherapy and Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab in Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results From the CheckMate 032 Randomized Cohort.

INTRODUCTION: Nivolumab monotherapy is approved in the United States for third-line or later metastatic small cell lung cancer based on pooled data from nonrandomized and randomized cohorts of the multicenter, open-label, phase 1/2 trial of nivolumab ± ipilimumab (CheckMate 032; NCT01928394). We report updated results, including long-term overall survival (OS), from the randomized cohort. METHODS: Patients with small cell lung cancer and disease progression after one to two prior chemotherapy regimens were randomized 3:2 to nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks or nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for four cycles followed by nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Patients were stratified by number of prior chemotherapy regimens and treated until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) by blinded independent central review. RESULTS: Overall, 147 patients received nivolumab and 96 nivolumab plus ipilimumab. Minimum follow-up for ORR/progression-free survival/safety was 11.9 months (nivolumab) and 11.2 months (nivolumab plus ipilimumab). ORR increased with nivolumab plus ipilimumab (21.9% versus 11.6% with nivolumab; odds ratio: 2.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-4.26; p = 0.03). For long-term OS, minimum follow-up was 29.0 months (nivolumab) versus 28.4 months (nivolumab plus ipilimumab); median (95% confidence interval) OS was 5.7 (3.8-7.6) versus 4.7 months (3.1-8.3). Twenty-four-month OS rates were 17.9% (nivolumab) and 16.9% (nivolumab plus ipilimumab). Grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse event rates were 12.9% (nivolumab) versus 37.5% (nivolumab plus ipilimumab), and treatment-related deaths were n =1 versus n = 3, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Whereas ORR (primary endpoint) was higher with nivolumab plus ipilimumab versus nivolumab, OS was similar between groups. In each group, OS remained encouraging with long-term follow-up. Toxicities were more common with combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy.
Authors
Ready, NE; Ott, PA; Hellmann, MD; Zugazagoitia, J; Hann, CL; de Braud, F; Antonia, SJ; Ascierto, PA; Moreno, V; Atmaca, A; Salvagni, S; Taylor, M; Amin, A; Camidge, DR; Horn, L; Calvo, E; Li, A; Lin, WH; Callahan, MK; Spigel, DR
MLA Citation
Ready, Neal E., et al. “Nivolumab Monotherapy and Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab in Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results From the CheckMate 032 Randomized Cohort.J Thorac Oncol, vol. 15, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 426–35. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtho.2019.10.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416731
PMID
31629915
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Thorac Oncol
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
426
End Page
435
DOI
10.1016/j.jtho.2019.10.004

Long-Term Survival after Complete Surgical Resection and Adjuvant Immunotherapy for Distant Melanoma Metastases.

BACKGROUND: This phase III study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of an allogeneic whole-cell vaccine (Canvaxin™) plus bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) after complete resection of stage IV melanoma. METHODS: After complete resection of ≤5 distant metastases, patients were randomly assigned to BCG+Canvaxin (BCG/Cv) or BCG+placebo (BCG/Pl). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS), and immune response measured by skin test (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00052156). RESULTS: Beginning in May 1998, 496 patients were randomized. In April 2005, the Data Safety Monitoring Board recommended stopping enrollment due to a low probability of efficacy. At that time, median OS and 5-year OS rate were 38.6 months and 44.9%, respectively, for BCG/Pl versus 31.4 months and 39.6% in the BCG/Cv group (hazard ratio (HR), 1.18; p = 0.250). Follow-up was extended at several trial sites through March 2010. Median OS and 5-year and 10-year survival was 39.1 months, 43.3 and 33.3%, respectively, for BCG/Pl versus 34.9 months, 42.5 and 36.4%, in the BCG/Cv group (HR 1.053; p = 0.696). Median DFS, 5- and 10-year DFS were 7.6 months, 23.8 and 21.7%, respectively, for BCG/Pl versus 8.5 months, 30.0%, and 30.0%, respectively, for the BCG/Cv group (HR 0.882; p = 0.260). Positive DTH skin testing correlated with increased survival. DISCUSSION: In this, the largest study of postsurgical adjuvant therapy for stage IV melanoma reported to date, BCG/Cv did not improve outcomes over BCG/placebo. Favorable long-term survival among study patients suggests that metastasectomy should be considered for selected patients with stage IV melanoma.
Authors
Faries, MB; Mozzillo, N; Kashani-Sabet, M; Thompson, JF; Kelley, MC; DeConti, RC; Lee, JE; Huth, JF; Wagner, J; Dalgleish, A; Pertschuk, D; Nardo, C; Stern, S; Elashoff, R; Gammon, G; Morton, DL; MMAIT-IV Clinical Trial Group,
MLA Citation
Faries, Mark B., et al. “Long-Term Survival after Complete Surgical Resection and Adjuvant Immunotherapy for Distant Melanoma Metastases.Ann Surg Oncol, vol. 24, no. 13, Dec. 2017, pp. 3991–4000. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-017-6072-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1279702
PMID
29019177
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
24
Published Date
Start Page
3991
End Page
4000
DOI
10.1245/s10434-017-6072-3