Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

3D Biology Signatures defined by Nanostring Max System

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Major User
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.

Authors
Valverde, PA; Burhansstipanov, L; Patierno, S; Gentry, S; Dwyer, A; Wysocki, KL; Patterson, AK; Krebs, LU; Sellers, J; Johnston, D
MLA Citation
Valverde, Patricia A., et al. “Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training..” Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4350–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32470.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409904
PMID
31503340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4350
End Page
4359
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32470

Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an understudied and aggressive form of breast cancer with a poor prognosis, accounting for 2-6% of new breast cancer diagnoses but 10% of all breast cancer-related deaths in the United States. Currently there are no therapeutic regimens developed specifically for IBC, and it is critical to recognize that all aspects of treating IBC - including staging, diagnosis, and therapy - are vastly different than other breast cancers. In December 2014, under the umbrella of an interdisciplinary initiative supported by the Duke School of Medicine, researchers, clinicians, research administrators, and patient advocates formed the Duke Consortium for IBC to address the needs of patients in North Carolina (an ethnically and economically diverse state with 100 counties) and across the Southeastern United States. The primary goal of this group is to translate research into action and improve both awareness and patient care through collaborations with local, national and international IBC programs. The consortium held its inaugural meeting on Feb 28, 2018, which also marked Rare Disease Day and convened national research experts, clinicians, patients, advocates, government representatives, foundation leaders, staff, and trainees. The meeting focused on new developments and challenges in the clinical management of IBC, research challenges and opportunities, and an interactive session to garner input from patients, advocates, and community partners that would inform a strategic plan toward continuing improvements in IBC patient care, research, and education.
Authors
Devi, GR; Hough, H; Barrett, N; Cristofanilli, M; Overmoyer, B; Spector, N; Ueno, NT; Woodward, W; Kirkpatrick, J; Vincent, B; Williams, KP; Finley, C; Duff, B; Worthy, V; McCall, S; Hollister, BA; Palmer, G; Force, J; Westbrook, K; Fayanju, O; Suneja, G; Dent, SF; Hwang, ES; Patierno, SR; Marcom, PK
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium..” J Cancer, vol. 10, no. 15, 2019, pp. 3344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.7150/jca.31176.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395729
PMID
31293637
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
3344
End Page
3351
DOI
10.7150/jca.31176

Associations between RNA splicing regulatory variants of stemness-related genes and racial disparities in susceptibility to prostate cancer.

Evidence suggests that cells with a stemness phenotype play a pivotal role in oncogenesis, and prostate cells exhibiting this phenotype have been identified. We used two genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of African descendants, from the Multiethnic/Minority Cohort Study of Diet and Cancer (MEC) and the Ghana Prostate Study, and two GWAS datasets of non-Hispanic whites, from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), to analyze the associations between genetic variants of stemness-related genes and racial disparities in susceptibility to prostate cancer. We evaluated associations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 25 stemness-related genes with prostate cancer risk in 1,609 cases and 2,550 controls of non-Hispanic whites (4,934 SNPs) and 1,144 cases and 1,116 controls of African descendants (5,448 SNPs) with correction by false discovery rate ≤0.2. We identified 32 SNPs in five genes (TP63, ALDH1A1, WNT1, MET and EGFR) that were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, of which six SNPs in three genes (TP63, ALDH1A1 and WNT1) and eight EGFR SNPs showed heterogeneity in susceptibility between these two racial groups. In addition, 13 SNPs in MET and one in ALDH1A1 were found only in African descendants. The in silico bioinformatics analyses revealed that EGFR rs2072454 and SNPs in linkage with the identified SNPs in MET and ALDH1A1 (r2  > 0.6) were predicted to regulate RNA splicing. These variants may serve as novel biomarkers for racial disparities in prostate cancer risk.
Authors
MLA Citation
Wang, Yanru, et al. “Associations between RNA splicing regulatory variants of stemness-related genes and racial disparities in susceptibility to prostate cancer..” Int J Cancer, vol. 141, no. 4, Aug. 2017, pp. 731–43. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/ijc.30787.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1253134
PMID
28510291
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Cancer
Volume
141
Published Date
Start Page
731
End Page
743
DOI
10.1002/ijc.30787

Item response theory analysis of the patient satisfaction with cancer-related care measure: a psychometric investigation in a multicultural sample of 1,296 participants.

BACKGROUND: We developed and validated a Patient Satisfaction with Cancer-Related Care (PSCC) measure using classical test theory methods. The present study applied item response theory (IRT) analysis to determine item-level psychometric properties, facilitate development of short forms, and inform future applications for the PSCC. METHODS: We applied unidimensional IRT models to PSCC data from 1,296 participants (73% female; 18 to 86 years). An unconstrained graded response model (GRM) and a Rasch Model were fitted to estimate indices for model comparison using likelihood ratio (LR) test and information criteria. We computed item and latent trait parameter estimates, category and operating characteristic curves, and tested information curves for the better fitting model. RESULTS: The GRM fitted the data better than the Rasch Model (LR = 828, df = 17, p < 0.001). The log-likelihood (-17,390.38 vs. -17,804.26) was larger, and the AIC and BIC were smaller for the GRM compared to the Rash Model (AIC = 34,960.77 vs. 35,754.73; BIC = 35,425.80 vs. 36,131.92). Item parameter estimates (IPEs) showed substantial variation in items' discriminating power (0.94 to 2.18). Standard errors of the IPEs were small (threshold parameters mostly around 0.1; discrimination parameters 0.1 to 0.2), confirming the precision of the IPEs. CONCLUSION: The GRM provides precise IPEs that will enable comparable scores from different subsets of items, and facilitate optimal selections of items to estimate patients' latent satisfaction level. Given the large calibration sample, the IPEs can be used in settings with limited resources (e.g., smaller samples) to estimate patients' satisfaction.
Authors
Jean-Pierre, P; Cheng, Y; Paskett, E; Shao, C; Fiscella, K; Winters, P; Patient Navigation Research Program,
MLA Citation
Jean-Pierre, Pascal, et al. “Item response theory analysis of the patient satisfaction with cancer-related care measure: a psychometric investigation in a multicultural sample of 1,296 participants..” Support Care Cancer, vol. 22, no. 8, Aug. 2014, pp. 2229–40. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-014-2202-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1041764
PMID
24664356
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
2229
End Page
2240
DOI
10.1007/s00520-014-2202-7

Directing National Policy Changes to Improve Cancer Survivor Quality of Life

Authors
Pratt-Chapman, M; Roberts, S; Leonard, J; Cowens-Alvarado, R; Sharpe, K; Patierno, S
MLA Citation
Pratt-Chapman, M., et al. “Directing National Policy Changes to Improve Cancer Survivor Quality of Life.” Psycho Oncology, vol. 21, Feb. 2012, pp. 2–2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub904261
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Psycho Oncology
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
2
End Page
2