Michael Kastan

Positions:

William and Jane Shingleton Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Director of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

Washington University in St. Louis

Ph.D. 1984

Washington University in St. Louis

Grants:

Kastan Gray Foundation Project

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Using bacterial CRISPR/Cas endonucleases to selectively eliminate HPV-transformed cells in vivo

Administered By
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Development and Validation of Novel Therapeutic Targets in Anal Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Administrative Supplements for P30 CCSG

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Duke Cancer Institute Application for Administrative Supplement for the P30 Cancer Center Support Grant to Develop Tobacco Cessation Treatment Capacity and Infrastructure for Cancer Patients

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Retrospective Diagnosis of Ataxia-Telangiectasia in an Adolescent Patient With a Remote History of T-Cell Leukemia.

Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar degeneration that is typically diagnosed in early childhood. A-T is associated with a predisposition to malignancies, particularly lymphoid tumors in childhood and early adulthood. An adolescent girl with minimal neurological symptoms was diagnosed with A-T 8 years after completing therapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, following a diagnosis of ATM-mutated breast cancer in her mother. We highlight the importance of recognizing ATM mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, appreciating the phenotypic heterogeneity of A-T, and defining optimal cancer screening in A-T patients.
Authors
Sze, S-GK; Lederman, HM; Crawford, TO; Wangler, MF; Lewis, AM; Kastan, MB; Dibra, HK; Taylor, AMR; Wechsler, DS
MLA Citation
Sze, Sei-Gyung K., et al. “Retrospective Diagnosis of Ataxia-Telangiectasia in an Adolescent Patient With a Remote History of T-Cell Leukemia..” J Pediatr Hematol Oncol, Nov. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/MPH.0000000000001672.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421634
PMID
31743320
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1097/MPH.0000000000001672

Low dose chloroquine decreases insulin resistance in human metabolic syndrome but does not reduce carotid intima-media thickness.

Background: Metabolic syndrome, an obesity-related condition associated with insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, leads to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoarthritis, and other disorders. Optimal therapy is unknown. The antimalarial drug chloroquine activates the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), improves metabolic syndrome and reduces atherosclerosis in mice. To translate this observation to humans, we conducted two clinical trials of chloroquine in people with the metabolic syndrome. Methods: Eligibility included adults with at least 3 criteria of metabolic syndrome but who did not have diabetes. Subjects were studied in the setting of a single academic health center. The specific hypothesis: chloroquine improves insulin sensitivity and decreases atherosclerosis. In Trial 1, the intervention was chloroquine dose escalations in 3-week intervals followed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Trial 2 was a parallel design randomized clinical trial, and the intervention was chloroquine, 80 mg/day, or placebo for 1 year. The primary outcomes were clamp determined-insulin sensitivity for Trial 1, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) for Trial 2. For Trial 2, subjects were allocated based on a randomization sequence using a protocol in blocks of 8. Participants, care givers, and those assessing outcomes were blinded to group assignment. Results: For Trial 1, 25 patients were studied. Chloroquine increased hepatic insulin sensitivity without affecting glucose disposal, and improved serum lipids. For Trial 2, 116 patients were randomized, 59 to chloroquine (56 analyzed) and 57 to placebo (51 analyzed). Chloroquine had no effect on CIMT or carotid contrast enhancement by MRI, a pre-specified secondary outcome. The pre-specified secondary outcomes of blood pressure, lipids, and activation of JNK (a stress kinase implicated in diabetes and atherosclerosis) were decreased by chloroquine. Adverse events were similar between groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that low dose chloroquine, which improves the metabolic syndrome through ATM-dependent mechanisms in mice, modestly improves components of the metabolic syndrome in humans but is unlikely to be clinically useful in this setting.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00455325, NCT00455403), both posted 03 April 2007.
Authors
McGill, JB; Johnson, M; Hurst, S; Cade, WT; Yarasheski, KE; Ostlund, RE; Schechtman, KB; Razani, B; Kastan, MB; McClain, DA; de Las Fuentes, L; Davila-Roman, VG; Ory, DS; Wickline, SA; Semenkovich, CF
MLA Citation
McGill, Janet B., et al. “Low dose chloroquine decreases insulin resistance in human metabolic syndrome but does not reduce carotid intima-media thickness..” Diabetol Metab Syndr, vol. 11, 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s13098-019-0456-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404051
PMID
31384309
Source
pubmed
Published In
Diabetol Metab Syndr
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
61
DOI
10.1186/s13098-019-0456-4

The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair.

The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors.
Authors
Henriksson, S; Rassoolzadeh, H; Hedström, E; Coucoravas, C; Julner, A; Goldstein, M; Imreh, G; Zhivotovsky, B; Kastan, MB; Helleday, T; Farnebo, M
MLA Citation
Henriksson, Sofia, et al. “The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair..” Genes Dev, vol. 28, no. 24, Dec. 2014, pp. 2726–38. Pubmed, doi:10.1101/gad.246546.114.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1054328
PMID
25512560
Source
pubmed
Published In
Genes Dev
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
2726
End Page
2738
DOI
10.1101/gad.246546.114

Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery after lethal low-dose-rate radiation.

PURPOSE: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. METHODS AND MATERIALS: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. RESULTS: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). CONCLUSION: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection against the harmful effects of LDR radiation.
Authors
Lim, Y; Hedayati, M; Merchant, AA; Zhang, Y; Yu, H-HM; Kastan, MB; Matsui, W; Deweese, TL
MLA Citation
Lim, Yiting, et al. “Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery after lethal low-dose-rate radiation..” Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, vol. 84, no. 3, Nov. 2012, pp. 800–06. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.01.026.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub779316
PMID
22445004
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys
Volume
84
Published Date
Start Page
800
End Page
806
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.01.026

Mdm2 regulates p53 mRNA translation through inhibitory interactions with ribosomal protein L26.

Mdm2 regulates the p53 tumor suppressor by promoting its proteasome-mediated degradation. Mdm2 and p53 engage in an autoregulatory feedback loop that maintains low p53 activity in nonstressed cells. We now report that Mdm2 regulates p53 levels also by targeting ribosomal protein L26. L26 binds p53 mRNA and augments its translation. Mdm2 binds L26 and drives its polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. In addition, the binding of Mdm2 to L26 attenuates the association of L26 with p53 mRNA and represses L26-mediated augmentation of p53 protein synthesis. Under nonstressed conditions, both mechanisms help maintain low cellular p53 levels by constitutively tuning down p53 translation. In response to genotoxic stress, the inhibitory effect of Mdm2 on L26 is attenuated, enabling a rapid increase in p53 synthesis. The Mdm2-L26 interaction thus represents an additional important component of the autoregulatory feedback loop that dictates cellular p53 levels and activity.
Authors
Ofir-Rosenfeld, Y; Boggs, K; Michael, D; Kastan, MB; Oren, M
MLA Citation
Ofir-Rosenfeld, Yaara, et al. “Mdm2 regulates p53 mRNA translation through inhibitory interactions with ribosomal protein L26..” Mol Cell, vol. 32, no. 2, Oct. 2008, pp. 180–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2008.08.031.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub779324
PMID
18951086
Source
pubmed
Published In
Mol Cell
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
180
End Page
189
DOI
10.1016/j.molcel.2008.08.031