Jiaoti Huang

Overview:

I am a physician-scientist with clinical expertise in the pathologic diagnosis of genitourinary tumors including tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney and testis. Another area of interest is gynecologic tumors. In my research laboratory we study prostate cancer, focusing on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as biomarkers, imaging and novel therapeutic strategies. In addition to patient care and research, I am also passionate about education. I have trained numerous residents, fellows, graduate students and postdocs.

Positions:

Endowed Department Chair of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Chair

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1983

Anhui Medical University (China)

Ph.D. 1991

New York University

Grants:

Histologic and Immunohistochemical Biomarkers for Heavily Treated Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Role and targeting of PRMT5 in prostate cancer

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
Purdue University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A novel strategy to identify prostate cancer biomarkers for patient management

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Stand Up 2 Cancer West Coast Dream Team Grant

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Confirmation of histologic SCNC (NEPC)

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A genetically defined disease model reveals that urothelial cells can initiate divergent bladder cancer phenotypes.

Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) is a rare and lethal phenotype of bladder cancer. The pathogenesis and molecular features are unknown. Here, we established a genetically engineered SCCB model and a cohort of patient SCCB and urothelial carcinoma samples to characterize molecular similarities and differences between bladder cancer phenotypes. We demonstrate that SCCB shares a urothelial origin with other bladder cancer phenotypes by showing that urothelial cells driven by a set of defined oncogenic factors give rise to a mixture of tumor phenotypes, including small cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor-derived single-cell clones also give rise to both SCCB and urothelial carcinoma in xenografts. Despite this shared urothelial origin, clinical SCCB samples have a distinct transcriptional profile and a unique transcriptional regulatory network. Using the transcriptional profile from our cohort, we identified cell surface proteins (CSPs) associated with the SCCB phenotype. We found that the majority of SCCB samples have PD-L1 expression in both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that immune checkpoint inhibitors could be a treatment option for SCCB. We further demonstrate that our genetically engineered tumor model is a representative tool for investigating CSPs in SCCB by showing that it shares a similar a CSP profile with clinical samples and expresses SCCB-up-regulated CSPs at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal distinct molecular features of SCCB and provide a transcriptional dataset and a preclinical model for further investigating SCCB biology.
Authors
Wang, L; Smith, BA; Balanis, NG; Tsai, BL; Nguyen, K; Cheng, MW; Obusan, MB; Esedebe, FN; Patel, SJ; Zhang, H; Clark, PM; Sisk, AE; Said, JW; Huang, J; Graeber, TG; Witte, ON; Chin, AI; Park, JW
MLA Citation
Wang, Liang, et al. “A genetically defined disease model reveals that urothelial cells can initiate divergent bladder cancer phenotypes..” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.1915770117.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424500
PMID
31871155
Source
pubmed
Published In
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Published Date
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1915770117

Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer.

Hormonal therapy targeting androgen receptor (AR) is initially effective to treat prostate cancer (PCa), but it eventually fails. It has been hypothesized that cellular heterogeneity of PCa, consisting of AR+ luminal tumor cells and AR- neuroendocrine (NE) tumor cells, may contribute to therapy failure. Here, we describe the successful purification of NE cells from primary fresh human prostate adenocarcinoma based on the cell surface receptor C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2). Functional studies revealed CXCR2 to be a driver of the NE phenotype, including loss of AR expression, lineage plasticity, and resistance to hormonal therapy. CXCR2-driven NE cells were critical for the tumor microenvironment by providing a survival niche for the AR+ luminal cells. We demonstrate that the combination of CXCR2 inhibition and AR targeting is an effective treatment strategy in mouse xenograft models. Such a strategy has the potential to overcome therapy resistance caused by tumor cell heterogeneity.
Authors
Li, Y; He, Y; Butler, W; Xu, L; Chang, Y; Lei, K; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Gao, AC; Zhang, Q; Taylor, DG; Cheng, D; Farber-Katz, S; Karam, R; Landrith, T; Li, B; Wu, S; Hsuan, V; Yang, Q; Hu, H; Chen, X; Flowers, M; McCall, SJ; Lee, JK; Smith, BA; Park, JW; Goldstein, AS; Witte, ON; Wang, Q; Rettig, MB; Armstrong, AJ; Cheng, Q; Huang, J
MLA Citation
Li, Yanjing, et al. “Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer..” Sci Transl Med, vol. 11, no. 521, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423084
PMID
31801883
Source
pubmed
Published In
Sci Transl Med
Volume
11
Published Date
DOI
10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428

LRIG1 is a pleiotropic androgen receptor-regulated feedback tumor suppressor in prostate cancer.

LRIG1 has been reported to be a tumor suppressor in gastrointestinal tract and epidermis. However, little is known about the expression, regulation and biological functions of LRIG1 in prostate cancer (PCa). We find that LRIG1 is overexpressed in PCa, but its expression correlates with better patient survival. Functional studies reveal strong tumor-suppressive functions of LRIG1 in both AR+ and AR- xenograft models, and transgenic expression of LRIG1 inhibits tumor development in Hi-Myc and TRAMP models. LRIG1 also inhibits castration-resistant PCa and exhibits therapeutic efficacy in pre-established tumors. We further show that 1) AR directly transactivates LRIG1 through binding to several AR-binding sites in LRIG1 locus, and 2) LRIG1 dampens ERBB expression in a cell type-dependent manner and inhibits ERBB2-driven tumor growth. Collectively, our study indicates that LRIG1 represents a pleiotropic AR-regulated feedback tumor suppressor that functions to restrict oncogenic signaling from AR, Myc, ERBBs, and, likely, other oncogenic drivers.
Authors
Li, Q; Liu, B; Chao, H-P; Ji, Y; Lu, Y; Mehmood, R; Jeter, C; Chen, T; Moore, JR; Li, W; Liu, C; Rycaj, K; Tracz, A; Kirk, J; Calhoun-Davis, T; Xiong, J; Deng, Q; Huang, J; Foster, BA; Gokhale, A; Chen, X; Tang, DG
MLA Citation
Li, Qiuhui, et al. “LRIG1 is a pleiotropic androgen receptor-regulated feedback tumor suppressor in prostate cancer..” Nat Commun, vol. 10, no. 1, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13532-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423359
PMID
31792211
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
5494
DOI
10.1038/s41467-019-13532-4

Prostate Cancer Detection Rate of Freehand versus 3-Dimensional Template Mapping Biopsy Using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion Device in Biopsy Naïve Men.

PURPOSE: Targeted prostate biopsy devices include a 3-dimensional digital template grid to guide systematic biopsy locations. Following a template could better ensure uniform and well distributed sampling of the prostate compared to the traditional freehand biopsy approach, possibly decreasing the chance of false-negative biopsy. Thus, we determined cancer detection rates obtained by conventional freehand systematic sampling vs template mapping sampling using a magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion device. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men who underwent first line conventional or image guided prostate biopsy were identified retrospectively in an institutional review board approved protocol. Excluded from study were men with prior biopsy or treatment or fewer than 10 cores taken. Targeted cores obtained by image guided biopsy were censored from analysis to simulate systematic template biopsy. The resulting cancer detection rate was compared to that of conventional biopsy. RESULTS: We identified 1,582 patients between 2006 and 2014 who met the criteria for analysis, including 1,052 who underwent conventional biopsy and 530 who underwent template biopsy with a magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion device. Patient age, prostate specific antigen and the number of systematic cores were the same in the 2 groups. Template biopsy detected any prostate cancer in 257 of 530 men (48.5%) and clinically significant cancer in 196 (37.0%) while conventional biopsy detected any cancer in 432 of 1,052 (41.0%) (p=0.005) and clinically significant cancer in 308 (29.2%) (p=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Template mapping systematic biopsy detected more prostate cancer than conventional sampling in biopsy naïve men. It is a promising cost-effective alternative to magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy as an upfront screening tool.
Authors
Zhou, SR; Chang, E; Patankar, A; Huang, J; Marks, LS; Natarajan, S
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1414992
PMID
31596671
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Published Date
Start Page
101097JU0000000000000587
DOI
10.1097/JU.0000000000000587

The expanded role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer: new aspects and targets.

Cancer cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support cell proliferation, growth, and dissemination. Alterations in lipid metabolism, and specifically the uptake and synthesis of fatty acids (FAs), comprise one well-documented aspect of this reprogramming. Recent studies have revealed an expanded range of roles played by FA in promoting the aggressiveness of cancer while simultaneously identifying new potential targets for cancer therapy. This article provides a brief review of these advances in our understanding of FA metabolism in cancer, highlighting both recent discoveries and the inherent challenges caused by the metabolic plasticity of cancer cells in targeting lipid metabolism for cancer therapy.
Authors
MLA Citation
Chen, Ming, and Jiaoti Huang. “The expanded role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer: new aspects and targets..” Precis Clin Med, vol. 2, no. 3, Sept. 2019, pp. 183–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/pcmedi/pbz017.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1414854
PMID
31598388
Source
pubmed
Published In
Precis Clin Med
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
183
End Page
191
DOI
10.1093/pcmedi/pbz017