Yiping He

Positions:

Associate Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2002

University of Pennsylvania

Post-doctoral Fellow, Pathology

Johns Hopkins University

Howard Hughes Researcher, Pathology

Johns Hopkins University

Research Associate, Pathology

Johns Hopkins University

Grants:

Exploiting MTAP deletion for GBM therapeutics

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Exploiting MTAP for more effective treatment of glioblastoma with temozolomide

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Developing novel mouse models for medulloblastoma

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Repurposing Remyelination Drugs for Oligodendroglioma Therapeutics

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer.

Hormonal therapy targeting androgen receptor (AR) is initially effective to treat prostate cancer (PCa), but it eventually fails. It has been hypothesized that cellular heterogeneity of PCa, consisting of AR+ luminal tumor cells and AR- neuroendocrine (NE) tumor cells, may contribute to therapy failure. Here, we describe the successful purification of NE cells from primary fresh human prostate adenocarcinoma based on the cell surface receptor C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2). Functional studies revealed CXCR2 to be a driver of the NE phenotype, including loss of AR expression, lineage plasticity, and resistance to hormonal therapy. CXCR2-driven NE cells were critical for the tumor microenvironment by providing a survival niche for the AR+ luminal cells. We demonstrate that the combination of CXCR2 inhibition and AR targeting is an effective treatment strategy in mouse xenograft models. Such a strategy has the potential to overcome therapy resistance caused by tumor cell heterogeneity.
Authors
Li, Y; He, Y; Butler, W; Xu, L; Chang, Y; Lei, K; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Gao, AC; Zhang, Q; Taylor, DG; Cheng, D; Farber-Katz, S; Karam, R; Landrith, T; Li, B; Wu, S; Hsuan, V; Yang, Q; Hu, H; Chen, X; Flowers, M; McCall, SJ; Lee, JK; Smith, BA; Park, JW; Goldstein, AS; Witte, ON; Wang, Q; Rettig, MB; Armstrong, AJ; Cheng, Q; Huang, J
MLA Citation
Li, Yanjing, et al. “Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer.Sci Transl Med, vol. 11, no. 521, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423084
PMID
31801883
Source
pubmed
Published In
Sci Transl Med
Volume
11
Published Date
DOI
10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428

A PRMT5-RNF168-SMURF2 Axis Controls H2AX Proteostasis.

H2AX safeguards genomic stability in a dose-dependent manner; however, mechanisms governing its proteostasis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a PRMT5-RNF168-SMURF2 cascade that regulates H2AX proteostasis. We show that PRMT5 sustains the expression of RNF168, an E3 ubiquitin ligase essential for DNA damage response (DDR). Suppression of PRMT5 occurs in methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP)-deficient glioblastoma cells and attenuates the expression of RNF168, leading to destabilization of H2AX by E3 ubiquitin ligase SMURF2. RNF168 and SMURF2 serve as a stabilizer and destabilizer of H2AX, respectively, via their dynamic interactions with H2AX. In supporting an important role of this signaling cascade in regulating H2AX, MTAP-deficient glioblastoma cells display higher levels of DNA damage spontaneously or in response to genotoxic agents. These findings reveal a regulatory mechanism of H2AX proteostasis and define a signaling cascade that is essential to DDR and that is disrupted by the loss of a metabolic enzyme in tumor cells.
Authors
Du, C; Hansen, LJ; Singh, SX; Wang, F; Sun, R; Moure, CJ; Roso, K; Greer, PK; Yan, H; He, Y
MLA Citation
Du, Changzheng, et al. “A PRMT5-RNF168-SMURF2 Axis Controls H2AX Proteostasis.Cell Rep, vol. 28, no. 12, Sept. 2019, pp. 3199-3211.e5. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2019.08.031.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1410992
PMID
31533041
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
3199
End Page
3211.e5
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2019.08.031

CRISPR Editing of Mutant IDH1 R132H Induces a CpG Methylation-Low State in Patient-Derived Glioma Models of G-CIMP.

Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH) occur in the majority of World Health Organization grade II and III gliomas. IDH1/2 active site mutations confer a neomorphic enzyme activity producing the oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG), which generates the glioma CpG island methylation phenotype (G-CIMP). While IDH1/2 mutations and G-CIMP are commonly retained during tumor recurrence, recent work has uncovered losses of the IDH1 mutation in a subset of secondary glioblastomas. Cooccurrence of the loss of the mutant allele with extensive methylation changes suggests a possible link between the two phenomena. Here, we utilize patient-derived IDH1R132H/WT glioma cell lines and CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockout to model the genetic loss of IDH1R132H, and characterize the effects of this deletion on DNA methylation. After D-2HG production has been abolished by deletions within the IDH1 alleles, these models show persistent DNA hypermethylation at seven CpG sites previously used to define G-CIMP-positivity in patient tumor samples. Despite these defining G-CIMP sites showing persistent hypermethylation, we observed a genome-wide pattern of DNA demethylation, enriched for CpG sites located within open sea regions of the genome, as well as in CpG-island shores of transcription start sites, after loss of D-2HG production. These results suggest that inhibition of D-2HG from genetic deletion of IDH alleles is not sufficient to reverse hypermethylation of all G-CIMP-defining CpG sites, but does result in more demethylation globally and may contribute to the formation of a G-CIMP-low-like phenotype. IMPLICATIONS: These findings show that loss of the IDH1 mutation in malignant glioma cells leads to a pattern of DNA methylation alterations, and shows plausibility of IDH1 mutation loss being causally related to the gain of a G-CIMP-low-like phenotype.
Authors
Moure, CJ; Diplas, BH; Chen, LH; Yang, R; Pirozzi, CJ; Wang, Z; Spasojevic, I; Waitkus, MS; He, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Moure, Casey J., et al. “CRISPR Editing of Mutant IDH1 R132H Induces a CpG Methylation-Low State in Patient-Derived Glioma Models of G-CIMP.Mol Cancer Res, vol. 17, no. 10, Oct. 2019, pp. 2042–50. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-19-0309.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1397070
PMID
31292202
Source
pubmed
Published In
Mol Cancer Res
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
2042
End Page
2050
DOI
10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-19-0309

Hereditary brain tumor with a homozygous germline mutation in PMS2: pedigree analysis and prenatal screening in a family with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome.

Precise genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis are often hindered by incomplete penetrance of risk variance and complex patterns of inheritance. Here, we performed a clinical and genetic study of a five-generation Pakistani family with a history of multiple cases of childhood brain tumors. Six affected individuals died of brain tumors at very early ages and three were confirmed as having a homozygous mutation in exon 6 of the PMS2 gene (c.543delT). Fifteen members of the family were identified as heterozygous carriers of this mutation with a lack of cancer incidence. Both clinical manifestations and genetic test results of brain tumor patients in the family support the diagnosis of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a condition in which individuals carry homozygous germline mutations in mismatch repair machinery genes with an early onset of malignancies such as glioma. This information was used to guide prenatal diagnosis with genetic testing on chorionic villus samples for the family. This is the first report of prenatal genetic diagnosis of hereditary brain tumor.
Authors
Baig, SM; Fatima, A; Tariq, M; Khan, TN; Ali, Z; Faheem, M; Mahmood, H; Killela, P; Waitkus, M; He, Y; Zhao, F; Wang, S; Jiao, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Baig, Shahid Mahmood, et al. “Hereditary brain tumor with a homozygous germline mutation in PMS2: pedigree analysis and prenatal screening in a family with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome.Familial Cancer, vol. 18, no. 2, Apr. 2019, pp. 261–65. Epmc, doi:10.1007/s10689-018-0112-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1358617
PMID
30478739
Source
epmc
Published In
Familial Cancer
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
261
End Page
265
DOI
10.1007/s10689-018-0112-4

Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas.

Frequent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) and the promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represent two significant discoveries in glioma genomics. Understanding the degree to which these two mutations co-occur or occur exclusively of one another in glioma subtypes presents a unique opportunity to guide glioma classification and prognosis. We analyzed the relationship between overall survival (OS) and the presence of IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas. We hypothesized and show that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS (11.5 months). Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. Analyzing gliomas based on their genetic signatures allows for the stratification of these patients into distinct cohorts, with unique prognosis and survival.
Authors
Killela, PJ; Pirozzi, CJ; Healy, P; Reitman, ZJ; Lipp, E; Rasheed, BA; Yang, R; Diplas, BH; Wang, Z; Greer, PK; Zhu, H; Wang, CY; Carpenter, AB; Friedman, H; Friedman, AH; Keir, ST; He, J; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Yan, H; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Killela, Patrick J., et al. “Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas.Oncotarget, vol. 5, no. 6, Mar. 2014, pp. 1515–25. Pubmed, doi:10.18632/oncotarget.1765.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1027276
PMID
24722048
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
1515
End Page
1525
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.1765